The Spiritual Workout

Training for the Conscious Mind. And Business.

I love this idea.

Tibet: An elderly Tibetan women holding a pray...
Tibet: An elderly Tibetan women holding a prayer wheel on the Lhasa’s pilgrimage circuit of Barkhor. The Barkhor, a quadrangle of streets that surrounds the Jokhang Temple, is both the spiritual heart of the holy city and the main commercial district for Tibetans. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s not for everybody. Some won’t think it proper for the workplace.  Some may find some of the views, ideas or practices contrary to their own beliefs.

I love it.  The ideas set forth mesh well with my own personal mission for work:

          Be – Do – Care

From their website:

At its core, Spiritual Workout is a practice.

It’s as simple as it is dynamic, as practical as it is non-religious, as compelling as it is unique, and as thought-provoking as it is uplifting.

It’s all about using these ancient and universally spiritual concepts…

Be Compassionate • Beliefs Matter • Be Present • Choices Abound • Everything Is Energy • Have an Attitude of Gratitude • Intentions Matter • Judgments Separate Us • Listen to Inspiration • Mind and Body Are Connected • Take Responsibility • The Law of Attraction Is Always On • We Are All Connected • We Are Here for a Reason • We Belong to the Planet, Not the Planet to Us

…as a means to grow, as a means to solve, heal, and move through – once and for all – the issues and challenges and problems of everyday life and living that have a tendency to drag us down.

When we practice (and practice and practice) filtering our issues through these concepts, everything changes.

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Hustle and Hassle

Thoughts on Hustle

Some thrive on the high energy hustle, the high octane, life in the fast lane, cant stop hustle to WIN.

Others live for the drama hustle, the look at me, i have stuff happening to me, pay attention now dammit hustle.

A select few live the loser hustle, the cut me some slack because I’m a victim way to get by.

I think my hustle is a well paced and planned hustle, doing the things i love, and stepping away from those things that I don’t love.

While discussing this topic on Facebook, someone made this pronouncement:

If you are a leader and visionary in any industry, well paced and steady isn’t enough

Maybe. Maybe not.

We all choose our own hustle. It’s part of sorting out the hassle.

One thing no one else will mention regarding the Northwestern Football “Union” #NLRB

 

The game isn’t over until someone sings (PC #HR type modification)

ESPN pods
ESPN pods (Photo credit: A*A*R*O*N)

Fellow #HRpuckhead John Jorgensen shared one of his wry witticisms on Facebook yesterday on the heels of the NLRB ruling that student athletes at Northwestern University were employees, and entitled to a vote to determine if they should be represented by a union for purposes of collective bargaining.

“I just love listening to sportscasters discuss labor law as if they know what they are talking about.”

John’s observation aside, there was some decent reporting and analysis out there, including this as reported by ESPN:

In a potentially game-changing moment for college athletics, the Chicago district of the National Labor Relations Board ruled on Wednesday that Northwestern football players qualify as employees of the university and can unionize.

NLRB regional director Peter Sung Ohr cited the players’ time commitment to their sport and the fact that their scholarships were tied directly to their performance on the field as reasons for granting them union rights.

Ohr wrote in his ruling that the players “fall squarely within the [National Labor Relations] Act’s broad definition of ’employee’ when one considers the common law definition of ’employee.'”

Ohr ruled that the players can hold a vote on whether they want to be represented by the College Athletes Players Association, which brought the case to the NLRB along with former Wildcats quarterback Kain Colter and the United Steelworkers union.

This release from Indiana University was also pretty good. They discuss the following issues:

A potential game changer for college athletics model
If upheld, decision could raise Title IX questions

Here’s a quick summary of the salient points

  • Football players weren’t viewed as being primarily student due to the fact they receive compensation and their coaches exercise a high degree of control over schedules.
  • The ruling only applies to students at private schools. Employees of state funded universities aren’t covered under the National Labor Relations Act.
  • Questions remain open if the facts applied to the analysis applied to football players would apply to all other student athletes under Title IX, as explained by Kenneth Dau-Schmidt, the Willard and Margaret Carr Professor of Labor and Employment Law at the IU Maurer School of Law.

If this decision is upheld and college football players at private universities begin to organize, Dau-Schmidt added, there is a good question of how this system would work consistently with the Title IX requirement of equal athletic opportunities for women.

“Where there is a positive cash flow in college athletics, it’s usually associated with men’s football and basketball, not other sports. At the bigger schools, men’s football and basketball revenue supports the other athletic programs. Would Title IX mean that the football players have to negotiate benefits for all athletes and not just themselves? That would make for a very curious system of collective bargaining.

What no one has mentioned so far is this.  So far, all the players have done is win a ruling that they are entitled to vote to decide whether or not they want to be represented by a union.  Setting aside all other likely challenges, the NLRB still has to hold the election, and a majority of players will have to vote in favor of the union in order for them to win the right to bargain for a collective bargaining agreement.  And then they have to negotiate and agree to a collective bargaining agreement.

Initial collective bargaining agreements are notoriously difficult to obtain.  Many times, workers vote for a union and then never obtain a collective bargaining agreement.  In this situation, many of the current student athletes will have graduated and moved on into the real world by the time any contract is reached.  I know of one current situation where a Teamsters local has been bargaining for more than two years to get a first contract in a distribution warehouse. Just imagine how complex the negotiations for student athletes will be compared to that.

This story has a long way to go before we see how much of a game changer it actually will be.

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Are you on the right path to success? (spon)

Are you on the right work path to success? (sponsored post)

Last week I posted about the Spherion study that looked at the Evolution of the Worker and a contest that they are running called “Job or Career?“. If you take the quiz, you can gain some great insights into to you own career mindset, and you could also win a prize.

Evolution of the Worker

From downsizing and ethics scandals to reputational issues and social media, Spherion has tracked the major influences on workers and how they, their expectations and needs have changed over time and what it means for the future.

Sample data includes:

  • In 2005, time and flexibility ranked highest by workers as retention drivers, signaling a significant shift in workers’ desires for greater work-life balance. This has continued as a priority ever since and intensified as Millennials entered the workforce.
  • In 2012, workers reported that a company’s online reputation is a major consideration when contemplating a job offer. It’s certainly not just about the compensation package anymore.

Key study findings:

  • 46% of workers agree that the recession has made them more interested in pursuing a work arrangement outside of traditional full-time employment.
  • By 2025, millennials will make up roughly 75% of the world’s workforce. According to findings in the EWS, they are also most likely to leave—40% of them will look for a new job in the next 12 months. With so many Gen Y employees making up the workforce, HR professionals can’t afford not to take notice.
  • Only 30% of employers said turnover/retention is their top HR concern. This lack of retention focus exacerbates the disconnect between employers and their employees.
  • 45 percent of all workers believe a company’s social media outlet is influential when choosing a new employer, yet only 27 percent of companies believe social media outlets are influential on how a candidate views their organization.

I spend more time than I care to think about at work, and that includes working at home in the evening, and many nights on the road during business travel. I love it and I hate it. There are days when I want to work to change it some ways. There are weeks when I can’t wait to out of my damn cubicle.

By taking the quiz on this site, you will be able to enter to win an American Express gift card! All you have to do is simply post your results from quiz as a comment to this post to enter. Taking the quiz will also enter users to win on of three CAreer Boost Business Packs from Spherion that incklue an iPad Air and bunch of other goodies.

Additional content related to this topic can be found at boost your work, including tips on mapping out a career path, ideas for to boost your workplace success and was to make your job a career.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Ends 03/27/14. Void Where Prohibited.

Disclosure Language:

Spherion partnered with bloggers such as me for their Emerging Workforce Study program. As part of this program, I received compensation for my time. They did not tell me what to purchase or what to say about any idea mentioned in these posts. Spherion believes that consumers and bloggers are free to form their own opinions and share them in their own words. Spherion’s policies align with WOMMA Ethics Code, FTC guidelines and social media engagement recommendations.

 

 

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How to get millions of free Getty images for your website

Getty changes the game with Embed

The images shown below are from Getty Images. Getty is the main source of legitimate imagery on the web, but have always been regarded as very expensive for the average blogger. They just changed the rules of that game. You are now allowed to use literally millions of Getty images on your web site for no charge, as long as you use their new Embed tool.  You can see how to make it work after the image jump.

This is potentially a big time tool for bloggers. Here how to use Embed from instructions via the Getty website.

Share images on blogs and social media

Getty Images is leading the way in creating a more visual world. Our new embed feature makes it easy, legal, and free for anybody to share our images on websites, blogs, and social media platforms.

Follow these simple steps:

  1. Click an image’s embed icon(</>) from the search results or image detail page.
  2. In the embed window, copy the embed code.
  3. Paste the HTML code you copied into the source code of a website or blog where you want this image to appear.*
  4. Publish and share!

Search images available to embed

 

 

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If you are a CHRO – this should be keeping you (and your people) awake at night

Labor Organizing looks different today 

 

English: Leon Bates handing out UAW literature...
English: Leon Bates handing out UAW literature during the 1941 organizing drive at the Ford Motor Company – River Rouge plant – gate #4 on Miller Road. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Organized labor is experimenting with new types of organizing and other innovations to restore their relevance and credibility. They are doing this in three main ways.

 

  1. Efforts to change policy and agency rules
  2. Adapting new forms of traditional organizing
  3. utilizing alt labor groups to organize in new ways

 

 

Consider the aptly named Organize the South effort. Viewed piece by piece, you might miss it, but connecting the dots reveals an ambitious scope of organizing efforts, including:

 

 

Chief Human Resources Officers should make sure that your HR team is aware of these developing trends.

 

 

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A bunch of Mike’s, including The Professor, but no Gilligan

Who am I?

 

It depends, according to Google.

 

Bob Denver as Gilligan on Gilligan's Island
Bob Denver as Gilligan on Gilligan’s Island (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

For the most part, I own the Google rights to “Michael VanDervort”, including my oft delayed but still forth-coming new blog site Michael VanDervort.  There are even sites set up by strangers that use my Instagram pictures for reasons that escape me.

 

What’s most fun is to find the alter ego Michael’s mixed into my Google awesomeness.   Say hi to them with me:

 

  • The rock and roll guy
  • my great, great, great, great, great, great, really super terrific ancestor
  • some other dude named MIchael who sued a bunch of other dudes
  • all the Michael’s belong to Spokeo (157 to be exact)
  • another list of Michael’s found in public records (83 to be exact)
  • the Professor, but no Gilligan alas
  • “Michael VanDervort” wanted in Shenzhen
  • Michael the Coronoer
  • Michael’s Florida mugshot
  • Mike, Mike, Mike…LinkedIn

 

It was fun getting to know myself….well, not my selves a little better.

 

 

 

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Labor Innovation and Experimentation

Organizing looks different today

Organized labor is experimenting with new types of organizing and other innovations to restore their relevance and credibility.  They are doing this in three main ways.

  1. Efforts to change policy and agency rules
  2. Adapting new forms of traditional organizing
  3. utilizing alt labor groups to organize in new ways

Consider the so-called “Organize the South” effort, and others like it. Viewed piece by piece, you might miss it, but add it up and it reveals an ambitious scope of efforts, including:

The links are worth a look.

SHRM 2014 Legislative Conference Recap #SHRMLeg

SHRM 2014 Legislative Conference #SHRMLeg

I attended the 2014 SHRM Employment Law & Legal Conference this week in Washington DC.  This is a great conference, packed with useful concurrent sessions and topical keynote speakers including Tucker Carlson, Paul Begala and Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez.  The conference is small, intimate and not nearly as overwhelming as the SHRM National events often feel.

It’s really the best way to experience a SHRM conference.  What other HR conference provides the opportunity to speak candidly with a sitting NLRB Board member, or have hallway conversations with Hank Jackson? The answer would be “none”.

There were many different concurrent sessions offering coverage on a variety of topics from mainstream stuff like the EEOC, ACA, workplace bullying, and the NLRB  to more edgy stuff like social media, worker centers and human trafficking.  And there were HR people being HR people, most of them flocking to the mainstream stuff, and a smaller number of brave souls going into the edgier sessions.

Lots of great networking events, parties, the dining of Washington DC, and oh yeah, snow – enough snow to shut down the US Government.  Yet the conference came off without a hitch. Kudos to SHRM for a great event.

I also had a chance to hang out with my peeps, the other great HR professionals who make up the SHRM special expertise panel on labor relations.  We talked about developing trends, potential future topics for HR Magazine, and the state of Labor Relations and HR in general.

Here’s one of the things I floated in our discussions.

Organized labor is experimenting with new types of organizing and other innovations to restore their relevance and credibility.  They are doing this in three ways.

  1. Efforts to change policy and agency rules
  2. Adapting new forms of traditional organizing
  3. utilizing alt labor groups to organize in new ways

Consider the so-called “Organize the South” effort. Viewed piece by piece, you might miss it, but add it up and it reveals an ambitious scope of efforts, including:

  • Local efforts to pass state minimum wage and paid sick leave laws
  • groups like Jobs with Justice acting as local hubs for community organizing
  • Efforts by the UAW  to organize Volkswagen and other southern transplant auto manufacturers
  • Morale Monday protests in more cities
  • AFL-CIO placing resources in Atlanta, Miami, Raleigh and Texas
  • Working America and other community organizing groups are adding resources and trainers in southern cities
  • Growth of the efforts of groups like Raise Up/Fight for $15
  • Organizing of airport employees in cities like Ft. Lauderdale
  • Teamster organizing efforts aimed at truck drivers in Savannah ports
  • Worker Centers active in many southern cities

Of course, as an organization SHRM doesn’t try to fight union organizing.  Our role on the labor panel is to make sure that HR professionals are aware of developing trends in business that could affect our companies. Looking at trends like these is one of those efforts.

Spherion: Celebrating the 2014 Emerging Workforce Study

Celebrating the Evolution of the Worker   

This is a sponsored post. 

Spherion partnered with bloggers such as me for their Emerging Workforce Study program. As part of this program, I received compensation for my time. They did not tell me what to purchase or what to say about any idea mentioned in these posts. Spherion believes that consumers and bloggers are free to form their own opinions and share them in their own words. Spherion’s policies align with WOMMA Ethics Code, FTC guidelines and social media engagement recommendations.

How I used to roll at work circa 1994

It may be too obvious to say that work has changed tremendously in recent years.  The tools I used 20 years ago are so different than the ones I use today that I actually can’t comprehend how I used to get my job done.  In 1994, I had a desktop computer at work, and another at home.  I carried a pocket beeper so my boss or fellow managers could “beep” me to call them back while travelling.  Fax machines were critically important, as were floppy disks.  I did have email and the Internet, which we called the World Wide Web.  There was no Google.

It isn’t like that now fortunately, and Spherion collects data every year to track the changes we experience in the workplace. This is useful info for HR professionals. The findings of the 2013 Emerging Workforce Study can be viewed here.

Spherion will release findings from its new 2014 Emerging Workforce Study in early April, marking the most recent year of research that began in 1997. Over more than 15 years, Spherion has surveyed nearly 200,000 workers to document groundbreaking research and report on important trends in the workforce.

  • The survey offers great statistics and trend information for HR managers and businesses, as well as providing tips on how to bridge the widening gap between employers’ and employees’ views.
  • The survey also includes data on generational differences, work-life balance and how social/digital media can impact HR strategies to increase engagement, productivity and retention, among other topics important to the workplace.

My work life for the past twenty years is essentially reflected in the infographic from Spherion featured below, except I never owned a purple suit.

The Evolution of the Worker Infographic

To highlight some of the interesting trends the EWS has uncovered over the last fifteen years, Spherion has developed an infographic depicting the evolution of the worker.

From downsizing and ethics scandals to reputational issues and social media, Spherion has tracked the major influences on workers and how they, their expectations and needs have changed over time and what it means for the future.

EOW Final (2)Sample data includes:

  • In 2005, time and flexibility ranked highest by workers as retention drivers, signaling a significant shift in workers’ desires for greater work-life balance. This has continued as a priority ever since and intensified as Millennials entered the workforce.
  • In 2012, workers reported that a company’s online reputation is a major consideration when contemplating a job offer. It’s certainly not just about the compensation package anymore.

Key study findings:

  • 46% of workers agree that the recession has made them more interested in pursuing a work arrangement outside of traditional full-time employment.
  • 45 percent of all workers believe a company’s social media outlet is influential when choosing a new employer, yet only 27 percent of companies believe social media outlets are influential on how a candidate views their organization.

Want to win a valuable prize?

In conjunction with releasing Spherion’s Evolution of the Worker infographic, Spherion is also releasing a new “Job or Career?” quiz to provide workers more information about their own “job or career” mindset.

The quiz is designed for consumers, HR professionals, employers, candidates and others who want to educate themselves more about applicable career topics.

Because you spend most of your waking hours at work, it’s important to know if your daily commitment to your job or career is fulfilling your work goals. This quiz, based on 15 years of research conducted by Spherion, will help you figure out if you are in a job or a career, and what steps to take to better improve your work life.

By taking the quiz on this site, you will be entered to win an American Express gift card! Simply post your results from the quiz as a comment on this post to enter.

Taking the quiz will also enter users to win one of three Career Boost Business Packs from Spherion that include an iPad Air and an assortment of other office essentials to help on their path to success!

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Ends 03/27/14. Void Where Prohibited.

 

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